Our Mission

Built on the belief that greater cultivation of indigenous crops can not only provide a secure, local food source, but also generate economic, environmental, and social benefits to farmers, BiB will serve as a catalyst to increase the production and demand for the bambara bean. Bambara is a nutritious, underutilized, and climate-smart legume that thrives in the arid climates of its native Sub-Saharan Africa. Highly versatile, bambara functions in the same industrial capacity as soy. By capitalizing on the growing demand for plant-based proteins, BiB is offering global consumers and manufacturers an innovative and sustainable alternative to the plant-based protein sources currently available.

Our Goals

BiB gives manufacturers a sustainable alternative to the protein sources they’re currently using (soy, pea, almond) which are primarily being harvested as a monoculture, with heavy chemical inputs such as fertilizer and pesticide, and which have serious repercussions to the local communities such as chemical runoff, dead zones, and biodiversity loss. These consequences affect all of earth’s inhabitants but the immediate effects are born by those working in the field and living nearby. We have also seen rampant abuses of labor across the agro-industrial complex, from farming to food-processing. BiB will challenge this model by sourcing beans directly from smallholder farming cooperatives, offering them a reliable buyer for their beans, and a secure source of foreign investment where there previously was no access to a foreign market. With this in mind, our goals are threefold:

 
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What Is The Bambara Bean?

The bambara bean is known as a "complete food", averaging 63% carbohydrate, 19% protein and 6.5% fat as well as key vitamins and essential amino acids.

Drought-tolerant and resilient, bambara does not require any chemical inputs such as fertilizer or pesticide nor excessive water use. This attribute makes bambara ideal for climate-smart agriculture.

Its nitrogen fixation makes it valuable for inter-cropping and crop rotation systems with maize, millet, sorghum, cassava, yam, etc. Bambara can also be used to improve soil fertilities in areas previously deemed non-arable.

Bambara is currently grown by small-holder farmers across Sub-Saharan Africa for subsistence and nutrition and its leaves are rich in nitrogen and potassium and can be used for human consumption or repurposed as animal feed.